Out of Sight - Out of Mind

 

The age-old saying “Out of sight, out of mind” is a reflection of how easy it is to disconnect from people, places and things. It is easy to feel a connection when you are physically in the presence of someone or something, or when looking at a photograph. However, it isn’t always so easy to feel that connection at other times.

 

Physical Presence

 

When you are with friends enjoying a meal on a restaurant patio looking out toward the mountains, it is easy to feel a connection to your friends, the restaurant, and the mountains. Likewise, you may see a vase or other item that your mother owns and think about memories you have when that vase sat on your grandmother’s table. This gives you a feeling of connection to both the vase and your grandmother. Likewise, you may fall in love with Rome when you visit, feel strong emotion toward a co-worker, or have a strong desire to purchase something that catches your eye.

 

Physically Disconnected

 

On the other hand, it is often far more difficult to feel this deep of a connection at a distance. A restaurant that you have never eaten at is simply a restaurant. Similarly, a vase that you have only heard about or seen in photographs is simply a vase. It might be intriguing because it belonged to your grandmother and you may be interested in it. However, it is not the same as if you have memories of it. Likewise, photos and videos of Rome may pull you into its charm. However, it is different than when you have a personal connection and memories after visiting the city.

 

This is why it is easiest to have emotions and empathy toward people you know personally. You may have emotions and empathy for others, but it is not the same as when you have a strong personal connection. Shared experiences and memories are driving factors in creating strong personal bonds.

 

Out of Sight

 

Now, what may be a very strong connection today can lose that connect when you are somewhere else, with other people, or not looking at an object. In some cases, these people, places, and things may come in and out of your conscious mind on a regular basis. In other cases, your memory may not be jogged until someone or something is mentioned. Or, alternately, you may only think of them when you next see them.

 

In these cases, you are not maintaining strong connections with these people, places, and things. When they are out of sight, they are out of mind.

 

Why?

 

A good question to ask yourself is “What have I put out of my mind?” You might want to ask yourself if there is a particular reason why you have placed that person, place, or object at a distance despite feeling a strong connection to it each time you are together.

 

Consider what things tend to slip your mind. Perhaps you occasionally talk to a friend and each time you talk about how you need to get together sometime. You plan to call and make arrangements, but it doesn’t happen. This would be a prime candidate for a person who falls into the “Out of sight, out of mind” category. Similarly, if every time you see a piece of art, you say to yourself, “I am going to save up so I can purchase that,” but then you go back to your life and forget about it until you see it again, it is also in this category. You feel a pull, but it isn’t strong enough to make you act.

 

So, are you forgetting someone, some place, or something? If so, what are you missing out on because you aren’t keeping your connection to them or it in your conscious mind?